Creativity And Solitude: How To Overcome Creative Isolation And Share Your Work

Creativity

Creativity is often a solitary process, but sharing it isn’t. How can creative work impact the world if it is never shared? How do creatives learn to step out of isolation and onto the stage to show our work?

Much of the creative process happens behind closed doors. Creativity happens in the mind, in private. Just like the caterpillar in a solitary cocoon, creativity needs this period of incubation and development to fully flower. However, the caterpillar will never reach its full potential of it stays in its cocoon. Generally, creative people are comfortable with isolation. The problem occurs when it is time to step onstage and share the fruits of our creative endeavors. Most creative people want to share their work and make their impact on the world, but many people are uncomfortable putting themselves and their work on display for the world to see. So, why is it so scary and difficult to overcome this creative solitude to share our creations?

No one sits and watches me paint or write all day. Besides the fact that this would likely be completely boring (as my husband says to every invitation to keep me company in my studio), it is also potentially distracting to me. However the reverse side of the coin is that complete fulfillment from creativity does not come exclusively from the act of creation, but is consummated in the act of sharing.

Like many artists I’m scared to draw back the curtain and unveil my progress, but this is a necessary step in the creative process. I recognize that sharing my work, as difficult as it is, brings me as much joy as creating the work. Referring back to the caterpillar emerging from a cocoon, this is a vulnerable position, but it is also critical to development. The new butterfly develops strength and capacity to fly as it fights to emerge from solitary confinement. So, how do we as artists develop this same strength and fortitude to overcome the habit of self-inflicted solitary confinement when it comes to sharing our work? The simplest answer is to just do it, but so often I’m unable to make myself. I hide in my comfort zone. For the longest time I couldn’t figure out what was holding me back. I want to share my work, but I get so afraid to do it.

An epiphany occurred to me when a friend suggested that I disable comments from others on a social media page on order to avoid this fear. My gut reaction to this suggestion was that doing so would cut me off from all the feedback of others. The compliments and even the occasional constructive and honest critique. Then I struggled to justify myself as I thought about why I wanted feedback but was still saying I was scared to share my work. All of a sudden it hit me that my biggest problem wasn’t what others thought- though that can be scary too. But rather my obstacle was my own perfectionism. I wasn’t so much afraid that someone would tell me my work was bad as I was of knowing it was bad myself, or thinking that it wasn’t yet good enough to share. But waiting for all my work to be perfect and to measure up to my often-ridiculous standards of perfectionism, I was hiding behind closed doors and doing myself a disservice by not sharing it, even if it is still as of yet either unfinished or less than perfect. More importantly, pinpointing precisely what my problem was, helped me to begin to take steps to overcome it.

I’ve gone through this process of learning to share my work with my paintings and my art. I’m experienced enough to know how good I am and also how good I’m not. I know where I excel and where I lack. What skills are assets and where I still need work and diligent practice. I’m generally familiar with how my work is received, and it’s easy to put my painting on display instead of feeling in the spotlight myself. However, writing is still something I do largely behind closed doors. And it’s scary again to step onto the stage. But throughout this process of discovering what I was really afraid of has helped me to see my audience as encouraging and supportive friends who will help me overcome my self-destructive perfectionism. And each time I must draw back the creative curtain, I get stronger and it gets easier. Sharing my creativity is always worth the risk.

Are you afraid to step onstage? Do you know what is holding you back?

Creativity Changes The World

Creativity

Everything that exists in this world does so because someone was creative. Creativity is that powerful.

Unfortunately too many people prescribe to the limiting believe that creativity has something exclusively to do with drawing ability or innate talent. This is the Myth of Creativity. Don’t believe it!

While being an artist is largely a creative endeavor and the capacity to be creative is something a person is born with, thankfully it is a capacity that lives with in all human beings, not just artists. It is a divine endowment to all God’s children. It is not something dependent on a person’s religious beliefs either.
The truth is, everyone is creative in some capacity or another. Creativity can be developed. Like all talents, it is a skill that can be, cultivated, enlarged and honed. Creativity is no more or less than the ability to think in new and different ways.

Everything is created spiritually before it can be created physically. It’s the execution or production of those ideas that requires the development of additional skills. For example, anyone can think of something like a flying car, but without the knowledge and understanding of a variety of different fields such as engineering, mathematics, aerodynamics, welding and fabrication, and a plethora of others I’m sure I’m missing, it would be another endeavor altogether to build such an invention.

This is why children are so creative. There are no limits to their imaginations. Children create spiritually, with no inhibitions. It is the development of skills that allows us to create physically. That is why adults are far more creatively skeptical. Adults recognize this discrepancy or the lack of skill.

Some creative endeavors are best executed as a collaborative effort. This kind of cooperation combines the talent, knowledge and skill of multiple individuals into a greater whole.

Creativity is such an integral part of our human identity that we marvel at signs of creativity in animals. Like the orangutan that uses a stick as a tool to extricate termites from their colony. Or the collaborative efforts of an ant colony to build and to overcome obstacles.

Creativity is as varied as the world is populous. There is always room for more ideas, new ideas. What’s your big idea? Have you developed the skills to execute it?

Think of what the world would be like with out the creativity of Thomas Edison or Benjamin Franklin, Albert Einstein, Motzart, Monet, Davinci or a plethora of others. What will the world lack without your creative contribution?

Every Home Should Have Original Art

Why Every Home Should Have Original Art And How To Get It

Luxurious Living

Sure I may be biased as a fine artist, but I believe that every home should have original art. Why? Because original art is a luxury. And who doesn’t want their home to feel more luxurious?

There are two ways to get original art.

  1. You could buy it.
  2. Or you could make it.

The first option to having original art in your home: buy it.

You’re probably thinking that “original art is expensive! I don’t have thousands of dollars to invest in a painting.” While expensive may be true of some original art, it is not true of all original art. If you think all original art is beyond your price range you probably haven’t shopped around far enough.

A high-end art gallery with hundreds of dollars of overhead isn’t the only place to buy art. There are art fairs all over the country (and likely the world) where artists (probably the starving ones) are selling their original work, searching for patrons of their creativity. Still think that’s out of your price range?

Try your local high school or community college. These institutions are filled with art students eager for their first clients. I know I was. And it wasn’t just about the money either. There was a sublime satisfaction in the plausibility that my work was “good enough” that someone actually wanted it enough to pay something for it. Students know they’re still learning their craft.

In addition to owning original art you’ll also be doing the artist an invaluable service not only by validating their efforts, but by giving them some practice in the real-world skill of selling and negotiating while working with you as a client. Because believe me, for any artist, negotiating prices for their work is the hardest part. And I would add that now, fifteen years later (not to mention that much more skilled at what I do) it is those first few clients who helped shape my career and who most qualify for special discounts and deals. Every artist would much more desire a patron than simply a one-time customer. When you demonstrate patronage you are more valuable as a customer and the working relationship moves beyond a simple transaction of money.

If you thought about it I’m sure you already know personally at least one artist whose work you admire. There is affordable original art out there.

The second option to having original art in your home: make it.

I know, I know, you’re thinking “that’s easy for you to say, you’re a painter.” But, as a painter, I can testify to the sense of fulfillment that comes from having my own art on display for the world to see. Well, any who enter my home that is. If in the very least it is a conversation piece with guests when you can say, “I painted that myself.” Still skeptical?

Enroll in a class. I can promise you as an art teacher with 15 years experience helping creative skeptics just like you, that with a little expert help from a teacher, you will be amazed at what you didn’t know you could do! Try it. You might even enjoy it.

I had a young student who sold his work of art within ten minutes of completing it at my studio. As a nine-year-old, “five dollars richer” made his day. And the buyer went home with a lovely piece of original art.

The thing about children and art is that children have no inhibitions to their creativity. Still struggling with the courage to pick up that brush? A child will do it without hesitation, and as a child you did too. Unleashing your inner artist is very much like freeing your inner child. Remember what it was like to be that child willing and able to try the new and exciting without fear of judgment or the stifling prospect of being “good enough.” A child will always tell you they’re a good artist. They have no doubt about it. Until they learn to doubt it.

Sponsor a child artist or better yet be creative together!

One final note about displaying art. No matter the quality of the work, the right frame can make or break the art. Yes I know, believe me, frames can be expensive too. But they don’t have to be. They do however have to compliment the work and not detract from it. Choose wisely. The simplest piece can look exquisite in the right frame, while the wrong frame can detract from the most beautiful painting. More on frames later.

No matter which of these methods you choose, having original art in your home will always add an element of luxury.

Do you have original art in your home? What significance does the work hold for you? Share in the comments.